Beacon technology has transformed the way location-based tracking and monitoring operate. Many technologies are already available within the marketplace, with common technologies such as Wi-Fi, BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy), RFID and Zigbee providing tracking/monitoring solutions.

Almost a necessity in the security industry, beacon technology allows for staff members to be tracked to their exact location. This useful when needing to demonstrate the whereabouts of a specific member of staff during a pre-determined period of time, also being handy when reviewing a breach of security or other serious instances.

Although other forms of tracking are available they could mean that the user of each individual radio would have to carry an extra scanner, wand, badge or tag, in some cases it may also involve the employer having to pay a monthly subscription fee for this luxury.

Saving both time and money, tagging and radio systems can be merged into one single device via the use of the Hytera Patrol Solution. Designed to be simple, user-friendly and cost efficient, when using Hytera’s Patrol solution it is not necessary to take out another monthly subscription cutting costs associated with similar systems.

A great solution for a variety of working environments, Hytera’s Patrol Solution is currently in operation in shopping centres, campus facilities, leisure destinations and many other campuses across the globe, those that require the patrol of both security personnel and the ordinary workforce.

How it Works

RFID tags are used as part of the Hytera Patrol Solution. RFID tags are made up of both an identification card (POA72) and a checkpoint (POA71), with the checkpoints being installed in the location that needs safeguarding within the premises alongside the intended patrol route of operatives. Using both RFID tags and the Hytera PD415 DMR radio, this with a pre-installed integrated RFID reader, this allows for personnel and assets to be monitored at all times.

Helping to increase safety and security whilst also boosting the efficiency of workers monitoring the intended route, at the start of shifts the user will register their radio with a patrol identification card, this by tapping it against the front of the radio, logging them into the patrol system. Whenever the user passes a checkpoint whilst patrolling their route, the radio is the be held against the checkpoint which scans the location using the RFID technology previously mentioned. Once scanned, the data that is acquired by the reader is then transmitted from the radio to the patrol software supplied by Hytera, a programme that can also be used in the initial mapping and route planning stage.

Any time an ID card is scanned it is recorded and stored, this means that should an incident occur then the location of operatives at the time can be analysed. A repeater or mobile radio is able to be used as the receiving station for this software, whilst the patrol system can also be connected via IP allowing for the monitoring team to be located on a separate site to the system in place, also allowing for the data to be transferred at a later time should coverage not be sufficient.