When using two way radios there are generally some unwritten rules on how to make best use of your communication devices. In order to make conversation easier between yourself and the recipient, various methods can be used.When first pressing the push to talk (PTT) button take a brief moment before relaying your message, this because there is a short delay with most radios before it begins to transmit. On newer releases of radios brands have began implementing a feature called time to talk, this sounds a bleeping noise until the radio is ready to transmit meaning that none of the communications are missed. Some radios that have this feature are the Motorola DP1400 and the Hytera PD505, although almost all current digital radios have implemented this feature.

Shorter talk time is also seen as the most effective way of communicating with colleagues. Due to only one person being able to transmit at a time, making a statement then waiting for acknowledgment before continuing with your next point allows for the person you are talking to being able to either agree or ask for further information on the subject. General terms are often used in radio communications, these may be things that you have previously heard not only via your own personal radio communications but in films and TV programs alike.

Radio Check – Can You Hear Me?
Read You Loud & Clear – Response to “Radio Check” Meaning Transmission is Good
Go Ahead – Ready To Recieve Transmission
Stand-By – Acknowledging the Message, But Unable To Respond
Roger/Ten Four – Message has been recieved/understood
Negative – No
Affirmative – Yes
Say Again – Repeat Your Message
Over – Message Completed
Break (x3) – Interruption due to Emergency
Come In – Asking second party to acknowledge they can hear you
Copy – You understand what has been said
Wilco – Meaning “I Will Comply”
Repeat – Used before repeating transmission

Identification is key in two way radio conversation, this because as mentioned before only one message can be transmitted at a time. Therefore, if a channel is populated with multiple radios in use, it may be unclear to other users who the message is directed towards. Identifying both who it is sending the message, and who it is targeted towards, unless of course it is aimed at a group of people then this should be made clear.

The NATO Phonetic Alphabet is the most widely used radiotelephone spelling alphabet. Created in order to avoid confusion, the Phonetic Alphabet allows for clear communications so that nothing is missed or misspelt. Recognised in a variety of languages, this alphabet is something that Radiotronics highly endorses to any company purchasing two-way radios, as if the work force is aware of it then it can make communications much more efficient.

A – Alpha – AL-FAH
B – Bravo – BRAH-VOH
C – Charlie – CHAR-LEE
D – Delta – DELL-TAH
E – Echo – ECK-OH
F – Fox-Trot – FOKS-TROT
G – Golf – GOLF
H – Hotel – HOH-TELL
I – India – IN-DEE-AH
J – Juliet – JEW-LEE-ETT
K – Kilo – KEY-LOH
L – Lima – LEE-MAH
M – Mike – MIKE
N – November – NO-VEM-BER
O – Oscar – OSS-CAH
P – Papa – PAH-PAH
Q – Quebec – KEH-BECK
R – Romero – ROW-ME-OH
S – Sierra – SEE-AIR-RAH
T – Tango – TANG-OH
U – Uniform – YOU-NEE-FORM
V – Victor – VIK-TAH
W – Whiskey – WISS-KEY
X – X-Ray – ECKS-RAY
Y – Yankee – YANG-KEY
Z – Zulu – ZOO-LOO